Recording a technical book

I work as a technical instructor and have done voiceover work. I've been asked to narrate books from other authors in my field. This narration would include minor editing of the recordings to repeat misspoken sentences and clean up "ums" and "ahs". Previously the company offered $3 per page when I wasn't doing the corrections. I didn't think that rate was appropriate then. Now the company has revamped how they want the project to proceed. With recording AND editing any suggestions on how I price this out? The typical book is a three to four hundred pages.

  • Chris, one approach would be to consider how many pages you can complete in an hour -- recording and editing and set a rate accordingly.
    1. What are other freelancers and studios in your area charging? If you can get a couple of samples for comparison. That can guide your efforts and also provide you with important negotiating points with your client.
    2. Test record and edit a variety of pages and time them for a realistic estimate of pages per hour.
    3. Decide on an hourly pay rate that is fair to you, even if you give them a little break on the typical market price, due to your long-term relationship. Divide by the number of pages to find your rate per page.
    4. Or, based on those same calculations, offer them fee-per-project quotes for each assignment.

    If the client thinks your fee is out of line, you can show them how you arrived at your quote. Perhaps they have no logical basis for what they want to pay and need to open their eyes.

  • Thank you, Royal. This is a great approach. I'll set up a little experiment today and give it a try.

  • Chris, one approach would be to consider how many pages you can complete in an hour -- recording and editing and set a rate accordingly.
    1. What are other freelancers and studios in your area charging? If you can get a couple of samples for comparison. That can guide your efforts and also provide you with important negotiating points with your client.
    2. Test record and edit a variety of pages and time them for a realistic estimate of pages per hour.
    3. Decide on an hourly pay rate that is fair to you, even if you give them a little break on the typical market price, due to your long-term relationship. Divide by the number of pages to find your rate per page.
    4. Or, based on those same calculations, offer them fee-per-project quotes for each assignment.

    If the client thinks your fee is out of line, you can show them how you arrived at your quote. Perhaps they have no logical basis for what they want to pay and need to open their eyes.

  • Thank you, Royal. This is a great approach. I'll set up a little experiment today and give it a try.