WordPress Web Site Development

I want to offer clients a set of WordPress web site packages.

1. Basic setup and configuration of one template on client's hosting provider
2. Installation, configuration of one template, with yearly hosting on my server
3. #2 above with the addition of WordPress security configuration and subscription to ongoing security monitoring

I know I have to work out what my time is worth but I am struggling with determining how much time I might actually expect to spend on doing the work.

  • This is a problem we all face starting out. You make your best guess, and chalk it up to experience if it takes you a lot longer than you think it's going to take.

    With yearly hosting, you should be very specific about what that means - will you be doing updates on their site? How often? What does an "update" mean? All this needs to be spelled out including what you're charging for out of scope work.

  • My suggestion would be to time yourself carrying out each of the three tasks and use those as your baseline figures. You will then need to add additional time to cover the account management associated with each sale (project scoping, feedback, amendments and tweaks etc) - this may be as much as 50% of the actual technical work.

    Once complete you should have a very rough estimate which can be refined for each future project until you are happy with the balance achieved.

    Hope this helps!

  • Wendy and Ben, thank you. Your responses aligned with my thinking. It's good to get feedback that confirms my initial plan.

  • Hi Kurt,

    My thoughts on WordPress security, after experiencing several clients getting their sites hacked, is that I've folded installation of security plugins into my base packages. It's non-negotiable, since I don't want them coming back to me with a hacked site.

    In terms of hosting, using a WordPress Managed hosting solution (SiteGround is an example) is also pretty critical for security, knowledgable support, and servers optimized for WordPress. And when my clients want their own hosting account, which is most of the time, I set them up with one of those hosting providers, then sign them up for an annual maintenance agreement. I actually come out ahead this way.

    In terms of how much time you can expect to spend on a job, there's no other way than to do them, you get faster as you go. The one thing I decide on a project-to-project basis, is if there's a learning curve, do I bill for that time. This is a tough one. Some people say "never" and others say "always." I think if your rates are low you can get away with it, but if you're charging a lot, the client expects you to know what you're doing!

    Hope some of this is helpful.

  • @Barbara my original intent was to fold the security work into the service offering. However, it has been a challenge to explain to the client why my package cost a more than what others offer. Too many clients downplay the need for proper security configuration and managment or assume that the other contrator aleady does the security. And of course, hacking their server and WP install to prove my case is both illegal and a bad way to start a relationship.

    https://monkeyhill.us/securing-wordpress-web-site/

    Thanks for your insight.

  • This is a problem we all face starting out. You make your best guess, and chalk it up to experience if it takes you a lot longer than you think it's going to take.

    With yearly hosting, you should be very specific about what that means - will you be doing updates on their site? How often? What does an "update" mean? All this needs to be spelled out including what you're charging for out of scope work.

  • My suggestion would be to time yourself carrying out each of the three tasks and use those as your baseline figures. You will then need to add additional time to cover the account management associated with each sale (project scoping, feedback, amendments and tweaks etc) - this may be as much as 50% of the actual technical work.

    Once complete you should have a very rough estimate which can be refined for each future project until you are happy with the balance achieved.

    Hope this helps!

  • Wendy and Ben, thank you. Your responses aligned with my thinking. It's good to get feedback that confirms my initial plan.

  • Hi Kurt,

    My thoughts on WordPress security, after experiencing several clients getting their sites hacked, is that I've folded installation of security plugins into my base packages. It's non-negotiable, since I don't want them coming back to me with a hacked site.

    In terms of hosting, using a WordPress Managed hosting solution (SiteGround is an example) is also pretty critical for security, knowledgable support, and servers optimized for WordPress. And when my clients want their own hosting account, which is most of the time, I set them up with one of those hosting providers, then sign them up for an annual maintenance agreement. I actually come out ahead this way.

    In terms of how much time you can expect to spend on a job, there's no other way than to do them, you get faster as you go. The one thing I decide on a project-to-project basis, is if there's a learning curve, do I bill for that time. This is a tough one. Some people say "never" and others say "always." I think if your rates are low you can get away with it, but if you're charging a lot, the client expects you to know what you're doing!

    Hope some of this is helpful.

  • @Barbara my original intent was to fold the security work into the service offering. However, it has been a challenge to explain to the client why my package cost a more than what others offer. Too many clients downplay the need for proper security configuration and managment or assume that the other contrator aleady does the security. And of course, hacking their server and WP install to prove my case is both illegal and a bad way to start a relationship.

    https://monkeyhill.us/securing-wordpress-web-site/

    Thanks for your insight.