Do you ever use cloud computing services (Amazon, Google, Microsoft, IBM, etc) to host your websites? Do you find that it's cheaper after a certain point in terms of scaling, load balancing, bandwidth consumption, etc?

I've used a variety of services over the years, including various ISPs, virtual servers, etc. I have my favorites - GoGrid and Linode come to mind, but I'd be interested in hearing other stories.

  • I've used Amazon, but not scalably so far. All my stuff is currently on Linode.

  • Do you use Linode as an ISP (ie, server hosting) or for their new web services? I've been a customer of theirs since the start of the year and have pretty much only good things to day about them.

  • I got a naked server from them — I literally started from a "minimal" CentOS 6.5 — and built it up myself to do web service and email (so far). I wanted to have a very secure, yet minimalistic, server setup, and no one seems to architect things the way I like.

    Some features:
    — No passwords, other than for email access.
    — SSH is protected, too many bad tries gets you banned forever
    — SFTP only, and only for specific users
    — Full anti spam and antivirus protection for email
    — A "virtual" email architecture — I'm not obligated to actually do web service or create real users to provide mail service for a user at a given domain, all I need is for the MX record to be pointed at my rig...

    Wordpress installations are similarly "hardened". I've banned about a dozen hackers from China, Russia, Iraq, Texas and Florida in the past week for things like attempting to log in to some ID called "admin" or something like it, trolling "?author=" pages, attempting to find unprotected plugin directories, and the like...

  • Yeah, hackers love WordPess. I've been an admin on a couple of sites that use it and they are forever dealing with hack attempts. WordPress has a lot going for it, but the admin hassles can be large.

  • It's not bad at all, assuming you've set it up correctly initially. I check mine maybe once a day, but that's mostly me being assiduous...

  • This comment has been removed with a light and loving touch.

  • This comment has been removed with a light and loving touch.

  • Depending on the size/scale of your endeavor, I would recommend Nearly Free Speech, especially for testing and staging.

    Small-time sites can stay here forever and save hundreds of dollars a year.

  • I've also been using AWS, but their powerful instances are costly, and the cheap instances are pretty weak.

  • I host numerous sites using AWS. I find that 90% of what I want to publish can be done using S3 buckets and Route53 DNS. In fact, if I can't publish it that way, I re-consider whether I really even want to do a project. It is remarkably inexpensive. I have over a dozen sites and my bill is like less than $2 a month and I have total autonomy over my hosting.

    I've also done a few projects using EC2 and they work well. But keeping the identity tokens and misc. environment passwords, etc. is not something I enjoy.

  • I've used Amazon, but not scalably so far. All my stuff is currently on Linode.

  • Do you use Linode as an ISP (ie, server hosting) or for their new web services? I've been a customer of theirs since the start of the year and have pretty much only good things to day about them.

  • I got a naked server from them — I literally started from a "minimal" CentOS 6.5 — and built it up myself to do web service and email (so far). I wanted to have a very secure, yet minimalistic, server setup, and no one seems to architect things the way I like.

    Some features:
    — No passwords, other than for email access.
    — SSH is protected, too many bad tries gets you banned forever
    — SFTP only, and only for specific users
    — Full anti spam and antivirus protection for email
    — A "virtual" email architecture — I'm not obligated to actually do web service or create real users to provide mail service for a user at a given domain, all I need is for the MX record to be pointed at my rig...

    Wordpress installations are similarly "hardened". I've banned about a dozen hackers from China, Russia, Iraq, Texas and Florida in the past week for things like attempting to log in to some ID called "admin" or something like it, trolling "?author=" pages, attempting to find unprotected plugin directories, and the like...

  • Yeah, hackers love WordPess. I've been an admin on a couple of sites that use it and they are forever dealing with hack attempts. WordPress has a lot going for it, but the admin hassles can be large.

  • It's not bad at all, assuming you've set it up correctly initially. I check mine maybe once a day, but that's mostly me being assiduous...

  • This comment has been removed with a light and loving touch.

  • This comment has been removed with a light and loving touch.

  • Depending on the size/scale of your endeavor, I would recommend Nearly Free Speech, especially for testing and staging.

    Small-time sites can stay here forever and save hundreds of dollars a year.

  • I've also been using AWS, but their powerful instances are costly, and the cheap instances are pretty weak.

  • I host numerous sites using AWS. I find that 90% of what I want to publish can be done using S3 buckets and Route53 DNS. In fact, if I can't publish it that way, I re-consider whether I really even want to do a project. It is remarkably inexpensive. I have over a dozen sites and my bill is like less than $2 a month and I have total autonomy over my hosting.

    I've also done a few projects using EC2 and they work well. But keeping the identity tokens and misc. environment passwords, etc. is not something I enjoy.