I'm a UX Designer. I understand the frameworks of all major front-end languages but I can't code very well myself. I use Axure RP which allows me to make pretty robust prototypes, but do ya'll think it is worth actually learning how to code proficiently?

Look forward to your feedback.

  • You'll have to elaborate with your question. What types of prototypes (on what platforms/environments) do you make with Axure? I can think of contexts in which one doesn't have to code, as well as those in which coding is demanded—even for UX designers. But more to your question: With prototyping software like Axure and Balsamiq, why learn to code when everything you need is already written? Hahaha!

    Well, coding's worth is up to your career goals. My background is in both coding and design; more specifically, web and iOS development and design management. If you just want to show clients what you're thinking prior to production of an application, then you don't need to code. In that scenario, you're showing them what's possible, but you can't code it—you'd hand it off to the coders to do that. If you want to show your client a functional prototype that parses and stores JSON, lets you sign in with oAuth, interfaces with other applications, and performs mathematical calculations with data, then I would learn coding. Depending on the type of application you're planning, you'd go through a development cycle with multiple prototypes; each one getting closer and closer to pubic release.

    Learning to code takes time (especially if you haven't a background in it), yet this knowledge can definitely help when making design decisions regarding aesthetics and interaction. Let's say you want to know if particular interaction schemes are feasible with front-end aesthetics. In this case, you can see the limitations with technology. Let's say you've an awesome design in mockups and/or a prototype with Axure—client signs off on the scope and budget; then, halfway through the project, you discover that certain objects in your view controllers result in thread errors. In this case, you need to find the right balance when negotiating between form and function, and coding knowledge certainly helps...

    In all, learning how to code proficiently will only add to the technological backbone of your design arguments. Moreover, you will know what's possible and how to implement such technologies while showing clients accurate portrayals of what they'll get when working with you.

    I hope this helps!

  • Learning to code is an amazingly powerful skill. Unlike learning a human language, learning one programming language gives you a huge advantage in learning the next and so on.

    The basic concepts like types, control structures and data structures as well as basic recipes can create a lifetime of proficiency.

    It can also be a lot of fun!

  • I'm not a "rockstar" coder, but I have been at it for awhile. What I enjoy most about coding is how it clarifies my thinking. I don't particularly enjoy writing code to create a UI and thankfully there are now many tools that provide a visual means for doing so quite effectively. But I do enjoy coding apps that need to analyze and process information. Learning to code gives you a great set of metaphors that are also tools (variables, operators, logical operators, modules, libraries) which are just really helpful in organizing the stuff you keep (and that goes on) in your head.

  • I'm not a code ninja either but just as yourself I have been at it for awhile now. In Winforms applications I cant lie I love the designer, but nonetheless the real work takes place in the code that's behind the scenes.

    I like coding because you are not limited to whats in the drop-down on the screen. You can bend and hammer it in to exactly what you want it to be with coding. If you are going to stick with just doing mock-ups then there is no real reason to learn coding. But if you are going to make those ideas an actual reality yourself then yes its definitely something to learn. Is it worth it? That really depends. It's not something that you can just pick up overnight, it's an acquired skill, you will get back from it what you put into it. Overtime as another said you will start to think differently and it will also show in your code which is really cool.

  • You'll have to elaborate with your question. What types of prototypes (on what platforms/environments) do you make with Axure? I can think of contexts in which one doesn't have to code, as well as those in which coding is demanded—even for UX designers. But more to your question: With prototyping software like Axure and Balsamiq, why learn to code when everything you need is already written? Hahaha!

    Well, coding's worth is up to your career goals. My background is in both coding and design; more specifically, web and iOS development and design management. If you just want to show clients what you're thinking prior to production of an application, then you don't need to code. In that scenario, you're showing them what's possible, but you can't code it—you'd hand it off to the coders to do that. If you want to show your client a functional prototype that parses and stores JSON, lets you sign in with oAuth, interfaces with other applications, and performs mathematical calculations with data, then I would learn coding. Depending on the type of application you're planning, you'd go through a development cycle with multiple prototypes; each one getting closer and closer to pubic release.

    Learning to code takes time (especially if you haven't a background in it), yet this knowledge can definitely help when making design decisions regarding aesthetics and interaction. Let's say you want to know if particular interaction schemes are feasible with front-end aesthetics. In this case, you can see the limitations with technology. Let's say you've an awesome design in mockups and/or a prototype with Axure—client signs off on the scope and budget; then, halfway through the project, you discover that certain objects in your view controllers result in thread errors. In this case, you need to find the right balance when negotiating between form and function, and coding knowledge certainly helps...

    In all, learning how to code proficiently will only add to the technological backbone of your design arguments. Moreover, you will know what's possible and how to implement such technologies while showing clients accurate portrayals of what they'll get when working with you.

    I hope this helps!

  • Learning to code is an amazingly powerful skill. Unlike learning a human language, learning one programming language gives you a huge advantage in learning the next and so on.

    The basic concepts like types, control structures and data structures as well as basic recipes can create a lifetime of proficiency.

    It can also be a lot of fun!

  • I'm not a "rockstar" coder, but I have been at it for awhile. What I enjoy most about coding is how it clarifies my thinking. I don't particularly enjoy writing code to create a UI and thankfully there are now many tools that provide a visual means for doing so quite effectively. But I do enjoy coding apps that need to analyze and process information. Learning to code gives you a great set of metaphors that are also tools (variables, operators, logical operators, modules, libraries) which are just really helpful in organizing the stuff you keep (and that goes on) in your head.

  • I'm not a code ninja either but just as yourself I have been at it for awhile now. In Winforms applications I cant lie I love the designer, but nonetheless the real work takes place in the code that's behind the scenes.

    I like coding because you are not limited to whats in the drop-down on the screen. You can bend and hammer it in to exactly what you want it to be with coding. If you are going to stick with just doing mock-ups then there is no real reason to learn coding. But if you are going to make those ideas an actual reality yourself then yes its definitely something to learn. Is it worth it? That really depends. It's not something that you can just pick up overnight, it's an acquired skill, you will get back from it what you put into it. Overtime as another said you will start to think differently and it will also show in your code which is really cool.